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progress made. if we just take a year in review. so, a year in review, in terms of deficit reductions. when the budget came out last year, it was predicted $1.1 trillion. it was 680 in the end. about a $400 billion deficit reduction from 2012 to 2013. then, we have a situation where i think hopefully we've broken the fever on the issues of having conversations about default. >> money that's overseas. are there efforts to bring money overseas permanently back to the states? >> it depends on how one is talking about that. we want to create a system that is clear and that is helpful for our companies to know what they're doing, how they're doing. and not discourage investments from coming back and finances from coming back to the u.s. >> tell me about going from bettenville, arkansas, in the private sector, back to the government. >> walmart is an institution of execution. that is what it is certainly known for. and fortunate to spend time and to be there. coming back to the federal government, certainly, as you reflected, one has to work and work on both sides of the aisle. i go up and down t
of the deficit. if there are things we can do in the administration, the old politics over policy, i think certainly in energy, certainly in several other key areas if we had a better view on policy versus politics, i think we'd see some more robustness. you look at the jobs that are created out of energy and the fracking business, you know, the average employee in theรง marcellus, $95,000 a year. 1.3 million jobs, $63 billion in additional tacks. energy independence is at the heart of getting this gdp up and running. >> growth cures all evil. it's great to see you. >> thank you for the opportunity. >> really appreciate it. >>> we have some breaking news now. bertha coombs, what can you tell us? >> the white house says it's going to allow -- to extend the current customers in the transitional plan yaal plans fo two years. 1.5 million individuals and small businesses. they will be renewable through 2016. also boosting 2015 deductibles and out of pocket costs by 4% and they're extending the open enrollment period for an extra month next year to february 15th. now, the white house deflected
that had obviously unsustainable balance of payment situations and that had current account deficits and that needed to have some kind of sell-off to rebalance and other countries where the fundamentals were fine. frankly, it seems like those fears weren't born out. i'm wondering what you think of the dynamic now give whatn what happening and in particular whether or not you think that this is going to have contagion effects elsewhere. >> this is an important question. the emerging markets are in the middle of a major capital outflow. i think some of the data shows that there's been money leaving emerging markets for over 15 weeks already now. >> 18. >> 18 weeks. and i think that we shouldn't expect this to change the matters very much. i think rebecca's question was spot on. how much has the russian action over the weekend really changed the macroeconomic situation and i think very little. i think that applies to the emerging markets as an asset class as well. >> but let me say something. it hasn't changed the macrosituation but it has changed the approach to risk. look what's going
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3